Why Michael Jordan’s Grove XXIII practice facility is one of the coolest spots in golf

Grove XXIII range

The Grove XXIII practice facility has two driving corridors with widths ranging from 27 to 33 yards to mimic the dimensions of PGA Tour fairways.

LC Lambrecht

In his NBA Prime, Michael Jordan abided by a grueling regimen that pushed him to train harder than everyone around him — and that inner drive hasn’t lost a step. The well-groomed swatch of greenery in the photo above is the practice range at Grove XXIII, Jordan’s private golf club, in Hobe Sound, Fla. It reflects the mindset of a man who’s never been accused of being unprepared.

“Michael believes that the training should always be harder than the playing, so failure becomes an opportunity to improve,” says Darren May, the facility’s designer and golf coach. In devising plans for the 16-acre range — which was shaped by Grove XXIII architect Bobby Weed — May relied on statistical data and consultation with PGA Tour stalwarts, the better to re-create the most demanding shots on Tour. Since opening last year, Grove XXIII has become a go-to training ground for the likes of Rickie Fowler and Justin Thomas, among the handful of Tour players who are members.

An aerial view of the Grove XXIII driving range in all its glory.

LC Lambrecht

But the concept can be customized for all skill levels. Prestigious Atlantic GC, on Long Island, recently cut the ribbon on a new range tailor-made by May and shaped by architect Tyler Rae. Other top courses have asked May for the same.

Welcome to the future. If you want to be like Mike, beating balls the same old way just won’t suffice. Check out some more photos below.

The teeing area for short-game practice, which allows you to focus on 20- to 50-yard shots via five hitting zones, with different lies and degrees of slope.

LC Lambrecht

The approach-game target greens, arranged at 25-yard increments from 50 to 200 yards, are divided into quadrants, with each landing area representing a different degree of difficulty. The flags are set on stands, not placed in holes, so they can be relocated easily.

LC Lambrecht

The teaching building opens on three sides, allowing you to hit shots toward the short-game areas or out onto the range.

LC Lambrecht

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A golf, food and travel writer, Josh Sens has been a GOLF Magazine contributor since 2004 and now contributes across all of GOLF’s platforms. His work has been anthologized in The Best American Sportswriting. He is also the co-author, with Sammy Hagar, of Are We Having Any Fun Yet: the Cooking and Partying Handbook.