This is how Matt Wolff spent his first $1.1 million winner’s check

Matthew Wolff holding his trophy directly after winning the 2019 3M Open.

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Any golfer’s first PGA Tour win is a monumental and fulfilling experience — it is the true barometer that unequivocally proves you are excelling in your craft. However, what is (arguably) sweeter than the trophy and prestige that one gets from winning, is the seven-figure check deposited straight into one’s bank account. 

For Matthew Wolff, who, in his third tour appearance, won the 2019 3M Open with a decisive putt on the 18th hole, the paycheck went a long way — in both affording him to provide for his family, but also to repay his debts to other tour golfers.

Matthew Wolff's TaylorMade equipment.
Winner’s bag: Matthew Wolff’s TaylorMade equipment at the 3M Open
By: Jonathan Wall

In a pre-tournament interview for the 2020 3M Open, Wolff was asked about what it was like receiving that $1,152,000 check, and what he spent it on. Wolff, answering humbly, mentioned how he used the money to purchase a house. However, he made sure to be economical and financially-responsible with his winnings.

I really didn’t splurge on anything,” said Wolff. “I didn’t get myself a sports car or do anything like that. I feel like I live a pretty simple life in regards of, you know, me going out and spending a bunch of money or buying a bunch of things.”

Wolff also stressed the importance of not being distracted by potential winnings or the prize pool, but rather focusing on playing his best golf.

“I’m thinking about the money or thinking about anything else, that’s when I don’t play my best,” Wolff mentioned. “So if I just make sure to stay in the moment and try to play the best golf I can, I know like the money will be there, the world ranking points, everything like that is going to take care of itself, so I just make sure to not think about all that.”

However, on a more light-hearted note, Wolff was asked about the $60 dollars he owed fellow tour professional Hollis Cavner. Wolff narrated how he was playing a friendly match against someone in a practice round, and didn’t have the money on hand to pay up after he lost a bet. Wolff ended up asking Carver for a small loan and Carver left Wolff his money in Wolff’s locker.

“It was just funny how it all kind of happened and ended up,” Wolff said. “And then at the end of the week, me winning the tournament. I think that’s honestly when I did pay him. I think it was after I won and after I got that check. He was like, “All right, now you have money to pay me back, I need my money back.

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Golf.com Editor