Jordan Spieth explains the fatal flaw in his putting stroke at the PGA Championship

jordan spieth putts

Jordan Spieth has struggled on the greens all week at the PGA Championship.

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Jordan Spieth’s putter has long been the biggest strength of his game. But this week at the PGA Championship, that faithful putting stroke has been his greatest downfall.

Spieth’s ball striking at the Ocean Course has been championship worthy as he guns for the career grand slam on Kiawah Island, but when he’s needed the putts to fall, the hole has seemingly shrunk.

Through 36 holes, Spieth’s SG: Putting stats were horrendous. He ranked 126th and 139th in the field on the greens over the first two rounds, keeping him from inserting himself into contention as he lost over four strokes to the competition with the flatstick.

Saturday was an improvement for the three-time major winner as he finally gained strokes on the greens during his four-under 68. However, even as some putts found the bottom of the cup, there is still work to be done before Spieth feels totally in control of his wand.

“I’m not getting the face turned around,” Spieth said. “I’m not getting the putter path appropriate, and I’m having to save it. … I think that’s just commitment through the stroke. Very frustrating through two rounds, [but] today was a bit better.”

Spieth said that with his left-hand low grip, getting the putterhead square early in the stroke is key. For players who putt with a traditional grip, they can release the putterhead through impact, but when the left hand is low, it’s important to get the face set early so there is less rotation through impact.

“I always feel good in the left hand when I have hold through the stroke,” he said. “When you have to rotate through impact, that’s a tough spot for me left-hand-low.

“That’s where I am now,” he continued. “I’m trying to eliminate that. … It’s obviously not great to try to figure out in the middle of a major championship, but I can go in with nothing but trust like I did today, tomorrow, and see if they start pouring in.”

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Golf.com Editor

Zephyr Melton is an assistant editor for GOLF.com where he spends his days blogging, producing and editing. Prior to joining the team at GOLF.com, he attended the University of Texas followed by stops with Team USA, the Green Bay Packers and the PGA Tour. He assists on all things instruction and is the staff’s self-appointed development tour “expert.”