Pro golfers are now allowed to use this ‘mobility tool’ on the course because of this rule

Brooks Koepka could have used a Hypervolt GO during the PGA Championship.

Brooks Koepka gets worked on during the 2020 PGA Championship.

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On the 30th hole of the PGA Championship, something odd happened. Brooks Koepka called physical therapist Marc Wahl over to stretch out his left leg. It happened again two days later, with Koepka in contention coming down the stretch on Sunday.

You see players on the sidelines of an NBA game get worked on by the training staff all the time, but this was a first for many golf fans. And we might see more of it, with the PGA Tour’s new partnership with Hyperice, a recovery technology company focused on helping athletes move well, on and off the course.

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As the newly designated official recovery device of the PGA Tour, Hyperice will put a “personal recovery device” — or more specifically, a Hypervolt GO percussion therapy gun — in the bag of every player to be used on the course during tournament rounds. 

How is this allowed? According to Rule 4.3b-1, players are allowed to use “equipment to help with a medical condition so long as the player has a medical reason to use the equipment and the Committee decides that its use does not give the player any unfair advantage over other players.”

The PGA Tour being the “Committee” in this instance means it has the authority to approve the Hypervolt GO, especially when every player on Tour will be provided one.

Now, a player will be allowed to work out any kinks, cramps or tightness that might be hindering their play wherever and whenever between the ropes, as long as it does not delay play. Further, the rules around use of the Hyperice GO during competition state that players should use them in “consideration for their competitors.”

How much help could a device like this give a player suffering through muscle tightness and how does it work? 

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According to Hyperice, percussion therapy provides targeted pulses of pressure into your muscles and tissue, which helps relieve muscle pain and stiffness while also increasing range of motion (a benefit for anyone who swings a golf club). Percussive stimulation provides this relief by reaching the superficial and deep muscle fibers, contributing to faster warmup and improved recovery following physical activity. 

You don’t have to be a Tour pro to reap the benefits of a percussive massage gun either. Whether your 9-to-5 has you sitting all day or your muscles are sore from your workouts, the Hypervolt GO is a great tool for anyone looking to improve their range of motion and feel better. 

Because the Hypervolt GO is small, lightweight and portable, it’s perfect to keep in your golf bag. Use it before, during and after your round for optimal performance and recovery.

Hypervolt GO

Ultra-lightweight with surprising power and whisper-quiet operation, the GO was designed to provide relief on the road.
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