3 drills to help you make a more athletic and powerful swing

drill example

Using the ground to your advantage will make it easier to generate power in your swing.

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In order to make a powerful swing, you must be able to use ground reaction forces to your advantage. But what are ground reaction forces? They’re essentially the way you use the ground to push off of and generate power in the swing.

Think Newton’s Third Law — every action has an equal and opposite reaction. So, if you push into the ground, the ground will “push back” and give you more power in your move. In a recent post on Instagram, the guys over at Athletic Motion Golf showed us three drills that can help you utilize these ground forces to your maximum benefit.

1. Small step drill

This drill is meant to simulate the proper pressure shift you should feel throughout the swing. Stand with the ball forward in your stance and your feet close together. As you begin your takeaway, take a small step with your back foot away from the target. When you get to the top of the swing, take a small step with your lead foot toward the target. This will give you the feeling of proper pressure movement in your feet without moving too much body mass.

2. Exaggerated Snead drill

The point of this drill is to feel the athletic movement of your legs in the swing, similar to the classic swing of Sam Snead. Set up to the ball and as you prepare to start your swing, pick your right heel off the ground. Now, slam your right heel into the ground as you begin your takeaway. You should feel the pressure spike in your left leg, which will allow you to make a decisive and powerful turn away from the ball.

3. Walking drill

For this drill, you want to stand about six feet away from the ball. You then want to start whipping the club back and forth as if you are swinging, and as you do so, taking small steps toward the ball. When you get close enough to the ball, you should hit it down the range. This creation of motion will help you sync up your timing and allow you to feel that same pressure shift in your feet, putting more athleticism — and with it, power — in the swing.

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Golf.com Editor

Zephyr Melton is an assistant editor for GOLF.com where he spends his days blogging, producing and editing. Prior to joining the team at GOLF.com, he attended the University of Texas followed by stops with Team USA, the Green Bay Packers and the PGA Tour. He assists on all things instruction and is the staff’s self-appointed development tour “expert.”