Tommy Fleetwood’s going low at the PGA with some *secret* irons in the bag

tommy fleetwood clubs

Tommy Fleetwood pictured with a secret new iron at the PGA Championship.

Getty Images

Every equipment writer has their “Where’s Waldo” moment. You’re perusing photos on Getty Images or sifting through bags on the practice range at a Tour event — a practice that would be frowned upon in the Covid era — and happen upon something new. Maybe it’s a prototype. Maybe it’s a classic club getting another shot.

Either way, it’s a finding that doesn’t stand out unless you look hard.

Laugh if you want (and I know many probably are), but there’s something exciting about unearthing these clubs. I bring this up because the exact situation played out on Friday as I was perusing Getty. With Tommy Fleetwood going low, I took a peek to see if he had anything new in the bag.

The TaylorMade P7TW irons — better known as Tiger’s irons — were still in play, but in one particular photo, there looked to be something new in Fleetwood’s hands. It was a blade-like profile with what appeared to be a distinctive, albeit beefier muscle pad design.

Assuming Fleetwood is still using a half set of P7TWs (6-9), it’s safe to assume the secret iron in question is a long iron of some sort. Maybe a product with a bit more forgiveness and ball speed. It’s a total guess, but with P7MB and P7MC prototypes surfacing in recent weeks, it’s possible this is another new product coming to market in the not-too-distant future.

As for Fleetwood, he’s been searching for a suitable option for the 235-yard gap in his bag. Last week, it was a 20.75-degree TaylorMade SIM Max rescue. This week? It’s a mystery iron with a TaylorMade badge on the toe.

If Fleetwood continues to perform at TPC Harding Park — he was five under at the time this post was published — it won’t be a mystery for much longer.

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Jonathan Wall

Golf.com

Jonathan Wall is GOLF Magazine and GOLF.com’s Managing Editor for Equipment. Prior to joining the staff at the end of 2018, he spent 6 years covering equipment for the PGA Tour.