How you can score custom Callaway ‘Curry 30’ wedges for The Match 3

Steph Curry's Callaway wedges

Callaway Golf

Steph Curry is used to ballin’ out on the court. He’ll have the opportunity to do the same thing on the course when the NBA star links up with Super Bowl champion Peyton Manning to take on Phil Mickelson and Charles Barkley in Capitol One’s The Match: Champions for Change — the third edition of the charity golf event.

To celebrate Curry’s inclusion in the event, Anthony Taranto, Callaway’s expert wedge craftsman, cooked up some head-turning Tour Limited “Curry 30” wedges for the occasion.

It’s unclear if Curry plans to use an identical set at Stone Canyon Golf Club in Arizona, but the average hack will have the chance to score a one-off set in a blind auction format.

All proceeds from the wedge purchase will go to the Eat. Learn. Play. Foundation, which was founded by Curry and his wife Ayesha. The handmade wedges feature Curry’s foundation logo on the 50-degree Jaws MD5 Tour Grey S-Grind head, signature on the 54-degree and jersey number on the 58-degree PM Grind. Each wedge is laser engraved and hand-stamped by Taranto.

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The heads are finished with a white and black paint fill, along with white and black weight port medallions. KBS’s Tour black and white shafts and a Grip Masters grip round out the build.

Those who want to take a shot at scoring the custom wedges will have a chance to do so through a blind auction that ends on December 7th. The highest bidder will earn the right to purchase the wedges at a price of $1 more than the bid of the second-highest bidder.

The catch is the bids are “blind,” so you won’t know where other potential bidders stand until the close of the auction.

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Jonathan Wall

Golf.com

Jonathan Wall is GOLF Magazine and GOLF.com’s Managing Editor for Equipment. Prior to joining the staff at the end of 2018, he spent 6 years covering equipment for the PGA Tour.