Add this simple backswing move to boost your hip turn

It’s easy to overcomplicate the golf swing, but in many ways, there’s no need to. The swing in many ways is a simple move: A big turn back, and another one through. Turn and turn; that’s the engine of your golf swing, and the key to hitting long drives.

But what happens when you struggle to create enough turn? That’s the problem GOLFTEC’s GOLF Top 100 Teacher Nick Clearwater and pro golfer Hannah Gregg help solve in the video above.

(And by the way, you can book your own lesson at GOLFTEC right here!)

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Straighten your leg to boost your hip turn

As the pair explain in the video above — and can see Hannah demonstrating below — a fault that a lot of high-handicap golfers fall into is keeping their body still as they lift their arms. Rather than making a powerful turn, this causes their arms to collapse at the top of their swing without much hip turn.

Instead, Hannah shows how thinking of straightening her trail leg on the backswing solves these myriad of problems. Tracked using GOLFTEC’s Optimotion system, you can see her hip turn increase 13 degrees, her shoulder turn increase 22 degrees, and her arms stretch further away from her. All power elements, added by the simple swing thought of straightening your leg.

NEWSLETTER

Luke Kerr-Dineen

Golf.com Contributor

Luke Kerr-Dineen is the Game Improvement Editor at GOLF Magazine and GOLF.com. In his role he oversees the brand’s game improvement content spanning instruction, equipment, health and fitness, across all of GOLF’s multimedia platforms.

An alumni of the International Junior Golf Academy and the University of South Carolina–Beaufort golf team, where he helped them to No. 1 in the national NAIA rankings, Luke moved to New York in 2012 to pursue his Masters degree in Journalism from Columbia University. His work has also appeared in USA Today, Golf Digest, Newsweek and The Daily Beast.