Try this Orange Whip drill to generate more clubhead speed and distance

Generating additional clubhead speed is all the rage in golf these days. There are a number of ways to do this (see: DeChambeau, Bryson), but one of the easiest is by making sure you are properly releasing the clubhead through impact. In today’s edition of Home Practice, instructor Erika Larkin explains a good drill for this using an Orange Whip training aid. Check out the video above or read below for more.

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“A release refers to your ability to hinge, unhinge and then rehinge the club and your wrist through the bottom of the swing,” Larkin says. “That pattern, or what we call ‘L to L,’ is a great thing to practice.”

The Orange Whip aid makes it easy to practice this move as the club is counterweighted. Take the club away like you would on your normal swing and really try to exaggerate the ‘L’ shape with your arms and the club. As you make your downswing, unhinge and release through impact to create power. Then on your follow-through you will hinge again into an ‘L’ shape.

“This is a squaring up mechanic that helps rotate the clubface along with your body to ensure that the ball goes straighter,” Larkin says. “But also you can hear the difference between no wrist and a full release.”

If done correctly, you should hear a whipping sound during your swing. This will indicate you are generating power correctly. As a modification, do the drill one-handed. You will really feel an exaggeration of how much the club should release and rehinge through impact. If you can properly rehinge through impact, you’ll be in great shape to pick up speed and distance.  

Golf.com Editor

Zephyr Melton is an assistant editor for GOLF.com where he spends his days blogging, producing and editing. Prior to joining the team at GOLF.com, he attended the University of Texas followed by stops with Team USA, the Green Bay Packers and the PGA Tour. He assists on all things instruction and is the staff’s self-appointed development tour “expert.”