4 areas where Cobra’s Aerojet drivers excel, according to our robot

Cobra's Aerojet lineup consists of three driver models.

Cobra

For the 2023 edition of GOLF’s ClubTest, we once again teamed up with Golf Laboratories for robotic driver testing. With the help of their swing robot, we’re able to get a better picture of how each driver performs at the same speed (95 mph), delivery and attack angle in a 9-point face mapping test. The result is an unbiased (and extremely detailed) look at where each driver model excels.

Here are robotic insights on Cobra’s all-new Aerojet, Aerojet Max and Aerojet LS drivers. The Cobra line will be available in retail stores on Feb. 9, 2023. Pick up all your new gear at Fairway Jockey.

1. Speed bump

The big story surrounding last year’s Cobra LTDx line was an incredible improvement in overall distance loss across all mis-hit locations in relation to shots hit out of the center. A penalizing miss was almost non-existent.

Ball speed retention remains a key storyline for 2023, but it’s clear Cobra pulled down hard on the ball speed lever. The Aerojet and Aerojet LS, in particular, recorded two of the highest ball speeds of any driver in the testing lineup. It’s also important to point out the ball speed number is an average of all nine points tested. (And only three driver models recorded higher speeds — if you’re curious.)

Gary Woodland raved about Aerojet’s speed after signing a multi-year deal with Cobra last week, but it’s always difficult to tell the difference between organic feedback and marketing-speak. Based on what we saw from Aerojet during testing, it’s the former in this case.

The speed is for real.

2. Cheat code

Rarely, if ever, does a mis-hit location produce a higher carry distance number when compared to the geometric center. Of course, outliers exist in every test. For the first time that we can recall, the higher center impact location on Aerojet’s standard head was roughly two yards longer than dead-center.

High center is always going to produce a performance dip — around three to four yards for most drivers we tested — when compared to a heel or toe miss, but the dip is minimal. Aerojet is one of those drivers that shakes things up.

If ever there was a time to tee it up and reap the benefits of more distance, this is it.

3. Air up there

With a launch angle of 12.9 degrees, the Aerojet Max recorded the second-highest launch angle and spin rate of any driver model. As much as we all want to hit low-spin bombs, an ideal launch and spin rate are needed to optimize carry distance. Sometimes that means increasing the spin rate to gain more hang time.

The Max is geared for golfers who struggle with consistent contact and need a larger sweet spot. In this case, it also comes with the ability to get the ball airborne with ease.

For mid-to-high handicappers who need an extra boost teeing it high and letting it fly, this could be a winning recipe.

4. Mr. Consistency

If the increased launch and spin have you intrigued by Aerojet Max, here’s one more reason to give it a look: Out of all the heads we tested, Cobra’s max forgiveness model produced the tightest dispersion of any driver. Cobra’s H.O.T. face raised the bar in overall consistency last year with Artificial Intelligence tuning the entire face.

The Aerojet Max is simply grabbing the baton from LTDx and continuing the race.

Bottom line, if consistency and launch deficiencies are common issues with the driver, Aerojet Max should be in the testing rotation. It checks a number of key performance boxes.

Want to overhaul your bag for 2023? Find a fitting location near you at GOLF’s affiliate company True Spec Golf.

JWall

Jonathan Wall

Golf.com Editor

Jonathan Wall is GOLF Magazine and GOLF.com’s Managing Editor for Equipment. Prior to joining the staff at the end of 2018, he spent 6 years covering equipment for the PGA Tour.