Try this expert-approved warmup move before your next round

A good warmup helps you make a free, fluid swing.

A good pre-round warmup isn't just good for your body, it's good for your game.

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This article was published in partnership with GolfForever.

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Most golfers when they hear the words “warm up,” immediately think of making swings on the range. 

If you watch any golf coverage, that is what you most often see as announcers tee groups up before they tee off — players going through their bags and dialing in their clubs. 

And so, there’s a pretty big misconception among amateurs about what a warmup really is and how to do one properly. Unfortunately, this misunderstanding of what a warmup is actually negatively impacts our ability to play our best on the course. That’s because we fail to properly get our bodies mobilized and ready to take on 6,000-some odd yards of golf.

A true warm up is really the 15-60 minutes Tour pros spend working out in the gym or in the fitness truck before they head to the range, a complete routine includes mobility, dynamic stretching, and some moderate exercise. Needless to say, a professional golfer doesn’t simply roll out of bed and start swinging their clubs like we so often do.  

Why not? 

Why pre-range warmups improve your performance

A GolfForever survey of 200 subscribers found that over 86% of those polled think the program’s pre-round warmup routines improve their performance and stamina on the course. 

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And if you asked PGA Tour players, I’m betting that statistic would be even higher. 

Stretching and mobilizing before your round isn’t just good for your body, it’s good for your game. The more mobile your body is, the more you’ll be able to turn in your golf swing and the further you’ll be able to drive your ball off the tee. That’s because properly preparing your body for a day on the course can go a long way, literally adding up to 45 yards of carry to your driver.

I know from my own experience that the right pre-round warmup routine leaves me moving more freely and feeling confident on the first tee.

Unfortunately, we the amateurs don’t have endless hours to spend on the course, let alone time to spend getting ready to spend hours on the course. So if you’re going to do one exercise to help your swing, choose something that will help you get the most bang for your buck.

And if you’re not sure where to start in terms of building an effective warmup routine, our readers can take advantage of an exclusive deal and get $20 off a one-year subscription to GolfForever’s fitness program to help play your best when the season starts. 

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As the managing director of GolfForever, Jon Levy, reiterates in the video below, a lack of mobility is not just bad for your golf swing, but can also cause injury. He also points out how spending a few extra minutes getting loose before a round can help you add some power off the tee. 

If you need proof of the power of a good pre-round warmup, give this exercise a try.

How to warm up your upper body

Diagonal Thoracic Mobility Arm Reach:

Using a chair, bend your knees slightly, hinge at your hips and place both palms on the seat of the chair. While lightly bracing your core, reach up with your left hand, following it with your eyes. This will open up your chest and improve your thoracic spine mobility, which will translate to a better shoulder turn through your back swing. Tip: Keep your low back stable as you rotate your arm.

If you’re serious about making 2021 your best year on the course yet, give this warm up mobility move a try, and check out GolfForever’s complete fitness programming. You’ll surprise all of your playing partners by the time the frost thaws and it’s time to get back out on the course. 

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