This is a Tour-proven accuracy strategy — so why don’t amateurs do it?

It's legal, so why not use it?

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I’m a recent putt-with-a-line-on-my-golf-ball convert. I went back and forth for years, but I committed last season and am glad I did. I feel like it gives me feedback on whether I make a good stroke or not (if the line wobbles, no good!) and by having the line on there to begin with, I have one less thing to think about.

In fact, I like using the line so much I’m thinking of amping it up a notch and using it off the tee.

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After all, why not? Putting and driving are the two most important parts of the game, and those are the only two areas on the course where you’re able to pick up your ball and align it how you want. Taking advantage of that on the greens has become commonplace, so why not take advantage of it off the tee, too?

It’s become increasingly common on the PGA Tour. Bryson DeChambeau does it, as does Maverick McNealy, who talked to GOLF.com about it recently: “I use the line on the tee to make sure my eye line is square and my alignment is good,” he said. “A lot of tee boxes aren’t always aligned. Some are aimed left; some are aimed right; if your body alignment is off, that’s a big miss.”

Once you have a better handle on where the target line is, you’ll have a better sense of your swing direction and, hopefully, find more fairways along the way.

Luke Kerr-Dineen

Golf.com Contributor

Luke Kerr-Dineen is the Director of Game Improvement Content at GOLF Magazine and GOLF.com. In his role he oversees all the brand’s service journalism spanning instruction, equipment, health and fitness, across all of GOLF’s multimedia platforms.

An alumni of the International Junior Golf Academy and the University of South Carolina–Beaufort golf team, where he helped them to No. 1 in the national NAIA rankings, Luke moved to New York in 2012 to pursue his Masters degree in Journalism from Columbia University and in 2017 was named News Media Alliance’s “Rising Star.” His work has also appeared in USA Today, Golf Digest, Newsweek and The Daily Beast.