Nick Faldo’s favorite pre-set drill will easily boost your swing speed

nick faldo drill

Nick Faldo's pre-set drill will add power to your swing immediately.

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Power is paramount in golf these days, and there are a number of ways you can achieve it. You can hit the gym like Bryson, or you can take on a speed-training challenge to generate more clubhead speed. But one of the easiest ways to achieve more clubhead speed is through ironing out the fundamentals of the swing.

You don’t need to make a violent lash at the ball to get more speed. In fact, overswinging can actually cost you clubhead speed if you abandon your fundamentals. To get the most out of your swing, the best course of action is to make sure you are getting maximum efficiency in your movements.

There are several parts of the swing that can sap power if not done correctly, and one of the biggest is how you hinge your wrists. Setting the wrists in the swing sets the table for maximum lag, and with it, maximum power.

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Setting the wrists early in the swing is a classic power move. Think Dustin Johnson, for example. He sets his wrists almost immediately during his takeaway, generating a larger arc as he turns away from the ball. An early hinge also gets the move out of the way early and allows you to just focus on the turn away from the ball from there.

In order to teach yourself how to set the wrists, this old drill from Nick Faldo should help tremendously. The premise is simple, and the payoff will blow you away.

For this drill, all you need to do is get in your setup and then immediately hinge your wrists. From there, simply turn away from the ball to the top of the swing.

“Simply all I do is turn my right shoulder behind me, but resisting with my right knee,” Faldo says. “As you can see, I’ve completed the backswing in a perfect position.”

It’s a simple drill to work on at the range, and if you can perfect it, you’ll see tremendous gains in consistency and power.

Golf.com Editor

Zephyr Melton is an assistant editor for GOLF.com where he spends his days blogging, producing and editing. Prior to joining the team at GOLF.com, he attended the University of Texas followed by stops with Team USA, the Green Bay Packers and the PGA Tour. He assists on all things instruction and is the staff’s self-appointed development tour “expert.”