This drill will help you find the center of the clubface more consistently

debbie doniger demonstrates drill

This drill will help you get more consistent center contact.

The key to a reliable short game (like most things in golf) is consistency. If you can become consistent with the contact on your shots around the green, you are guaranteed to have better control of the ball and will see lower scores.

Achieving that consistency is easier said than done though, and really the only way to find that consistency is through practice. Finding the center of the clubface with your wedges, no matter the lie, is the best way to ensure you are making consistent contact. To practice this, GOLF Top 100 Teacher Debbie Doniger showed us this drill as a part of our Home Practice Series. Watch the video or continue reading for more.

For this drill, you want to gather a few balls and your wedge and set up for short chip shots. Then, set up with the ball on the toe of your clubface and make a stroke, but make sure you try to hit the ball on the center of the clubface by rerouting the club on the way down.

Next, set up with the ball set up on the heel of the club, make a stroke and reroute the club so you make center contact. Then do the same thing with the club hovered above the ball but reroute it on the swing for center contact.

Do each of these setups four times, making sure each time the ball make contact in the center of the clubface.

If you can get comfortable finding the center of the clubface no matter where the head starts, you will find it easier when you’re on the course on tough lies. Integrate this drill into your practice routine and you’ll be more consistent around the greens in every scenario.

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Golf.com Editor

Zephyr Melton is an assistant editor for GOLF.com where he spends his days blogging, producing and editing. Prior to joining the team at GOLF.com, he attended the University of Texas followed by stops with Team USA, the Green Bay Packers and the PGA Tour. He assists on all things instruction and is the staff’s self-appointed development tour “expert.”