One of the best putters on Tour reveals his 2 favorite drills

Aaron Baddeley has putting drills that can help you.

Aaron Baddeley has been a mainstay on the PGA Tour since first arriving in 2003. His ball-striking has gone through peaks and valleys through the years, but there’s been one ever-present strength that has hardly failed him: his putting.

Just look at his stats over the past 10 years. One putting slump between 2017 to 2018 aside, he’s been a fixture in the top 10 best putters on the PGA Tour. It’s the kind of numbers most pros would dream of…

Aaron Baddeley SG: Putting

2010: .502 (17th)

2011: .324 (34th)

2012: .604 (8th)

2013: .661 (5th)

2014: .872 (2nd)

2015: .722 (1st)

2016: .586 (8th)

2017: .044 (89th)

2018: -.057 (128th)

2019: .654 (6th)

And now, thanks to a remarkably modest Instagram post, he’s revealing the two putting drills he trusts the most.

1. Lead-Arm Only

A drill you’ve maybe seen before: The first drill Badds relies on is to take your normal setup, but to putt with your lead arm only. As you can see, Baddeley lets his lead arm extend down the target line, which keeps the clubface square and generates the feel he wants to recreate in his actual stroke.

2. Altered Trail-Hand Grip

His second trusted drill is similar in purpose to his first. He uses a cupped trail hand, which once again allows him to feel the clubface staying square to the target line for longer, and prevents the right hand from taking over and closing the clubface.

generic profile image

Luke Kerr-Dineen

Golf.com Contributor

Luke Kerr-Dineen is an English-American who oversees instruction and other service content across all of GOLF’s multimedia platforms. An alumni of the International Junior Golf Academy and the University of South Carolina–Beaufort golf team, where he helped them to No. 1 in the national NAIA rankings, Luke moved to New York in 2012 to pursue his Masters degree in Journalism and Media from Columbia University. Following graduation, he spent two years as a digital editor at Golf Digest before spending three years at USA Today.