How these ‘performance’ beers can help you recharge after your round

Sometimes a cold beer is hard to pass up on the course.

Sometimes a cold beer is hard to pass up on the course.

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There’s nothing more satisfying than finishing a round of golf and heading to the 19th hole with your buddies to settle up and drink up. 

Unfortunately, beer isn’t the healthiest thing you could consume after a taxing round of golf. Because you just burned a ton of calories (between 800 and 2000 depending on whether you walked or not) your body most likely needs water and food to help you recover, but a nice frosty pint of beer is often hard to pass up. 

So what if that post-round beer could help you do just that by replacing the electrolytes you lost after hours in the sun? 

If that sounds like an ideal compromise, we’re happy to tell you that those types of beers exist!

Health-conscious consumers have created a huge market for healthy alcoholic beverage options. It’s one of the main factors fueling the boom in hard seltzers and their success over the last few years.  

Breweries big and small are following suit, except they’re taking their inspiration from sports drink companies like Gatorade and adding ingredients like vitamins, antioxidants and electrolytes so that post-round (or mid-round) beer is better for you. 

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These electrolyte-infused beers also usually contain a lower alcohol percentage, so they won’t make you feel sluggish or dehydrate you quite as fast as a regular brew. 

What’s more, electrolytes play a huge role in conducting nervous system impulses, contracting muscles and keeping you hydrated. In other words, they’re very important for a golfer spending hours in the sun to play his or her very best.

For a golfer that likes to drink on the course, the electrolytes and lower alcohol content of these better-for-you beers could lead to slightly better scores, too. The electrolytes will help you feel good and keep you moving well on the course while the lower alcohol percentage means it will take you longer to get buzzed, which should at least delay the side effects of drinking like impaired judgment and coordination.  

It’s hard enough to hit a little golf ball semi-straight sober, and it only gets harder as you consume more alcohol. The easiest solution is to not drink on the course at all, but if you must drink, drink a beer that helps you helps you keep your competitive edge. 

What’s more these types performance beers tend to have fewer carbs and calories, which can help you achieve your fitness goals while still enjoying a beer with your buddies. 

For example, Harpoon’s Rec League is made with chia seeds and buckwheat kasha, which add vitamin B and minerals to the brew, as well as Mediterranean sea salt for electrolytes. On top of these healthier ingredients, Harpoon’s brew is a low-carb, low-calorie option that rivals Michelob Ultra and will satisfy any IPA-lover.

Small breweries are taking over the performance beer category.

While Bud Light and Michelob Ultra are probably the best known light beers in the space, some small breweries like Harpoon, Zelus and Dogfish Head Craft Brewery are taking over the “performance” beer category. 

Zelus has the widest offering with five beers containing potassium salts, sodium salts, and calcium salts — adding up to delicious electrolyte-packed brews. 

Dogfish Head Brewery has been in the performance beer game for almost a decade, launching their first “active lifestyle beer,” Namaste, to be enjoyed post-yoga session. This Belgian-style white ale tastes just as good after a full 18 though, and will fit right in with your active lifestyle. 

So the next time you stash a six-pack in your golf bag or head to the 19th hole, try something with a lower alcohol percentage and some unique ingredients that make your beer a little better for you. 

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Golf.com Editor